Loose Crank

Mountain Bike Product Reviews and Guides

My Rear Shock Ran Out Of Rebound

I love making my bike pop.

Zooming down a trail and popping off of every kicker I can find is my favorite way to ride. For this, a trail bike is ideal.

I also really enjoy riding drops and jumps. Some of them get kinda big. It’s tough to quantify “big”, but it’s around the range of “thank god for volume spacers otherwise I’d be bottoming out my suspension”—big.

In the case of riding drops (or jumps), rebound helps to help control the landing.

My trail bike, which is my “one bike in the quiver” do-it-all bike, came with a Rock Shox Pike RC 150mm up front, and a Rock Shox Monarch RT3 in the rear.

The Pike has been awesome.

The Monarch? Also awesome. But one thing I wasn’t aware of when I bought my trail bike, is the possibility of running out of rebound.

I’m 180 lbs. For the amount of air pressure I run in my rear shock to have it at 30% sag, I find that dialing the rebound damping 1-click from the slowest setting is perfect for 97% of the riding I do.

That other 3 percent? That’s when I’m riding a big drop.

What is Rebound?

To give myself an extra bit of assurance when going for big air, I like to add 1 or 2 clicks more rebound damping from my usual settings.

Rebound controls how fast the suspension returns after compression. Having it too fast can make it feel like you’re being bucked around on your bike.

In the case of riding drops (or jumps), rebound helps to help control the landing. Having your suspension rebound too fast can get you into a speed wobble if your landing isn’t perfect. Too too fast and you can even get bucked off the bike.

To give myself an extra bit of assurance when going for big air, I like to add 1 or 2 clicks more rebound damping from my usual settings.

Time To Upgrade?

I asked my friends and Kinetic Cycles , the shop where I got the bike from, and the general consensus is that I’m riding beyond what the shock was meant for.

I can sort of see this. The Monarch RT3 doesn’t have a lot of clicks for fine tuning adjustment (10, which is decent, actually). But of the clicks it does have, it doesn’t have as much range of adjustment as I’ve found on more gravity oriented shocks. It doesn’t have a piggy back resevoir for better heat management. You wouldn’t find this shock on a kitted out, long travel enduro bike. It’s a mid-range trail shock, and I’m guessing Devinci figured most people riding trail bikes won’t be sending it big.

Well, to remedy my rebound conundrum I decided to upgrade to a Fox Float X2, which I bought from the awesome guys over at Worldwide Cyclery .

The Fox Float X2 is often lauded as being the best air sprung rear shock currently available. I decided to get one so that I can use it as a benchmark when reviewing other shocks in the future.

Bob sounds like a nice guy.

Fox suspension products allow for a ridiculous amount of rebound damping on their products. If you so chose, you could have your suspension rebound back as slow as molasses. But, no one requires something that slow.

The Catch

One drawback I just realized after having spent the cash and holding this wonderful masterpiece of suspension engineering in my hand: There’s no rebound knob. It’s not a knob, it’s a tiny dial. A tiny dial that requires a hex key.

Rebound. Good luck tweaking that from the saddle.

Well, shit.

I dread that my on the fly rebound change might look something like this:

  1. Whip out a multitool.
  2. Tweeze out the 6mm hex.
  3. Adjust rebound.
  4. Put the tool back in my pocket.
  5. Ride the drop.
  6. Stop riding.
  7. Whip out multitool, again.
  8. Tweeze out the 6mm hex․․․again.
  9. Dial the rebound back.
  10. Put the tool back in my pocket.
  11. Continue riding.

(I left out a step between 5 and 6, give a Joey style “How you ‘doin?” to the girls.)

Depending on whether I feel its worth the hassle, I may just stick to having slower rebound overall. I’ll post a full review later.

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Lyndon

Written By

Lyndon

I'm an avid mountain biker and web developer. When I'm not riding I'm daydreaming of riding. Being a technically minded person I extend my analyses of MTB related things to you through writing.

Riding Styles: Enduro, Downhill

Preferred Terrain: Steep tech

Current Steed: 2017 Devinci Troy

Location: Beautiful Vancouver, BC 🇨🇦

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